Discrimination

Expanding Women’s Leadership in Mongolian Politics and Business

For centuries, Mongolian women have played a central role in their society, holding positions of power ever since the Mongol Empire – hundreds of years before their counterparts in Europe, or elsewhere in Asia. Challenges Changes to the election law this year reduced the quota for female candidates to be nominated by political parties from 30% to 20%. Within the civil service sector, only 26.6% of State Secretaries are women. Only 56.6% of women active in Mongolia’s workforce, versus 69.3% of men Today, women remain integral to Mongolia’s economy, society and politics. In the home, they are often breadwinners, as well as caretakers. At work, they are increasingly influential, partly because they are often better educated, with more Mongolian girls completing school than boys. But partly al...

Orange the World

Imagine a world without violence against women and girls. Imagine a world without violence. This is the world we want for all. But we have a ways to go to get there. Today our newspapers are full of troubling headlines – from domestic violence, to sexual harassment in the workplace and the use of rape as a weapon in war. Sexual and gender-based violence is the most pervasive human rights violation in the world. Yet it often goes unrecognized. UNDP is joining with other UN agencies in the #OrangeTheWorld campaign to end violence against women and girls. Together with activists around the world, we’re using the colour orange to call attention to the various forms of violence that prevent women and girls from reaching their full potential. Gender-based violence damages mental and physical hea...

The world has much to learn from indigenous peoples

From my lifelong experiences, being an advocate for the rights of some of the most marginalized peoples, allow me to share what I have learned and come to see as essential elements to ensure peaceful societies and sustainable development in a plural world. Celebrating diversity Indigenous peoples contribute to diversity, and their history emphasizes the importance of revitalizing and celebrating ancient cultures, music, languages, knowledge, traditions and identities. Living in an era where xenophobia, fundamentalism, populism and racism are on the rise in many parts of the world, celebrations and positive messages about the value of diversity can contribute to counter negative stereotypes, racism and discrimination and instead foster tolerance, innovation and peaceful coexistence between ...

Living Free and Equal

In the quarter-century since the publication in 1990 of the first Human Development Report, the world has made astounding strides in reducing poverty and improving the health, education, and living conditions of hundreds of millions of people. And yet, as impressive as these gains may be, they have not been distributed equally. Both between countries and within them, deep disparities in human development remain. Consider infant mortality. In Iceland, for every 1,000 live births, two children die before their first birthday. In Mozambique, the figure is 120 infant deaths for every 1,000 live births. Similarly, in Bolivia, babies born to women with no education are twice as likely to die within a year than babies born to mothers with at least a secondary education. And these disparities cont...

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