Sustainable Development

Unpaid care and domestic work – a global challenge with local solutions

Read this very interesting blog by Clare Bishop, Senior Consultant for the OECD Policy Dialogue on Women’s Economic Empowerment, on OECD-Development Matters and learn more about the challenges of unpaid care and domestic work nowadays: https://oecd-development-matters.org/2018/03/14/unpaid-care-and-domestic-work-a-global-challenge-with-local-solutions/

10 Things We All Should Know About Indigenous People

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. To mark the occasion, the President of the UN General Assembly has convened a high-level event to take stock of progress and discuss what more needs to be done. It’s a good time for all of us to consider why it’s important to protect indigenous peoples’ rights. Here are 10 things we all should know about indigenous people. 1. WHEREVER WE LIVE, INDIGENOUS PEOPLES ARE OUR NEIGHBOURS. There are an estimated 370 million indigenous people in the world, living across 90 countries. Indigenous communities are present in all geographic regions and represent 5,000 different cultures. 2. INDIGENOUS PEOPLE SPEAK AN OVERWHELMING MAJORITY OF THE WORLD’S 7,000 LANGUAGES. Indigenous languages ...

Achieving Gender Equality and Female Empowerment: A Collaborative Vision of Sustainable Development Goal 5

 10 January 2018 – Tackling gender inequality is our shared responsibility, and is fundamental to   reaching a more just, peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world for all, United Nations Deputy   Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed said today as she opened the 2018 Vienna UN Conference. In a statement read out by the conference coordinator, Ms. Mohammed welcomed the focus at this       year’s gathering on Sustainable Development Goal 5, achieving gender equality and empowerment of   women and girls. The Organization would count on all to meet these shared objectives towards achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Jean-Luc Lemahieu, UNODC’s Director of Division for Policy Analysis and Public Affairs, highlighted some positive trends in the implementation o...

Working with African judges to protect rights of people living with HIV

  The third Judges’ Forum was held in Johannesburg, South Africa in June. Photo: UNDP Africa More than 30 judges from 14 African countries convened in Johannesburg, South Africa 15­–17 June this year for the third annual Regional Judges’ Forum to discuss HIV and tuberculosis (TB)-related jurisprudence as part of an ongoing initiative to sensitise senior judges and uphold the rights of people living with HIV in Africa. “The judiciary must be available for the minority, and in adjudicating cases on minority issues, we must be guided by information, by science, by law, by consideration of justice. If we do so, then we shall have served our purpose”, said Botswana High Court’s Justice Key Dingake, one of the participants at the UN Development Programme (UNDP)-supported meeting. Duri...

Multidimensional Poverty Index

  Read the full explanation of the Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) on the HDRO website: http://hdr.undp.org/en/content/multidimensional-poverty-index-mpi

Expanding Women’s Leadership in Mongolian Politics and Business

For centuries, Mongolian women have played a central role in their society, holding positions of power ever since the Mongol Empire – hundreds of years before their counterparts in Europe, or elsewhere in Asia. Challenges Changes to the election law this year reduced the quota for female candidates to be nominated by political parties from 30% to 20%. Within the civil service sector, only 26.6% of State Secretaries are women. Only 56.6% of women active in Mongolia’s workforce, versus 69.3% of men Today, women remain integral to Mongolia’s economy, society and politics. In the home, they are often breadwinners, as well as caretakers. At work, they are increasingly influential, partly because they are often better educated, with more Mongolian girls completing school than boys. But partly al...

Poverty isn’t permanent.

What is poverty? Is it increasing or decreasing?   Camila Gonzalez, 9 years old, studies at home on a computer she received through Uruguay’s “One Laptop per Child” programme. Enrollment in primary education, one of the surest means of reducing poverty, has increased significantly since 2000. The enrolment rate in developing regions reached 91 percent in 2015. Photo: Pablo La Ros/UNDP We challenged people in New York City to rethink what they know about poverty. Here’s what they had to say: Despite common misperceptions, poverty isn’t permanent! The world is making headway in the fight against poverty. Since 1999, we’ve reduced the percentage of people around the world who live in extreme poverty from 28 percent to 11 percent. That’s about 250,000 people worldwide who climb out of pov...

Protecting Our Planet’s Lungs

By UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME IN CLIMATE CHANGE, INDIGENOUS & RAINFOREST The Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) initiativeis a partnership between FAO, UNDP and UNEP. “We cannot live without our land,” says Cirila Tete, an indigenous leader living in the last refuge of the Harakmbut Amazonian people: the Amarakaeri Communal Reserve. As a member of Boca Isiriwe, one of the 10 native communities in this protected territory, Cirila defends the largest, most intact primary forest in Peru’s Southern Amazon region. The area is the source of livelihoods for more than 1,700 indigenous people, and Cirila is one of its stewards, protecting it from the ravages of mining and illegal logging. Because they breathe in carbon dioxide and breathe out oxygen, t...

Human Development that “cares”

In a recent dialogue, members of civil society and governments explored the practical and political steps to leave no one behind through the experiences of those who are excluded. Sarah, a 16-year-old from Chicago, USA, asked the decision makers around the table how it was possible that she and her siblings were abandoned and suffered physical violence for six years without anybody raising the alarm to help them. They were neglected by the (under resourced) social services, the government, the neighbors, the hospital employees and even their own family. She was “left behind”. To her, what is even harder than the five years of lost schooling or the trauma caused by the abuse, is trying to understand why nobody cared. The 2016 Human Development Report (HDR) recommends putting in place “natio...

Human security and natural disasters

The last few months have seen many natural disasters across the world, raising global attention on disaster risk reduction. In August, unusually heavy rainfalls flooded South Asia, killing over 1,200 people and displacing at least 2.5 million in Bangladesh, India and Nepal. On 7 September, the strongest earthquake to hit Mexico in a century killed 98 people, affecting 1.5 million in the state of Chiapas. Twelve days later, another major earthquake rattled Mexico City, killing over 300 people and injuring over 4,600. Three devastating hurricanes battered the Caribbean and the United States in August and September 2017, killing hundreds of people, displacing over 2 million and costing hundreds of billions of dollars in economic losses. Two of these were Category 5 hurricanes, an exceptional ...

Life does not end after 60 and neither should the data

Our world is rapidly ageing. By 2050, our planet will be home to twice as many people aged 60 or more than there are today. At the same time, the population aged 80 or more will triple in size, according to UN Division for Economic and Social Affairs’ 2017 Revision of the World Population Prospects. Even sub-Saharan Africa, a region better known for its youthful populations, is experiencing population ageing, with an expected tripling of its population 60 years and over from 64 million older women and men today to 220 million by 2050. These trends will have a profound impact on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development globally and even more so in sub-Saharan Africa. The world’s integrated efforts to eradicate poverty, ensure quality healthcare and reduce gender ine...

Multidimensional poverty and its assessment found their place in the 2030 Agenda

Adopting the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable development at the World Summit on 25-27 September 2015, the world leaders have recognized that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. From a human development perspective, we welcome the 2030 Agenda, and all national and international discussions, debates and dialogues about the multidimensional nature of poverty. Especially we welcome initiatives to include measures of multidimensional poverty into the list of indicators that will help monitor and track achievements in eradication of all forms of poverty. The Human Development Report Office (HDRO) has always been at the forefront in complementing the traditional m...

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